Domain and Range

Why is domain and range so tough for students? I’ve really worked on slowing down and teaching domain and range in detail the past few years. The idea that students are asked to find all the x’s and y’s that belong to a graph or situation is overwhelming. I believe part of the problem is that the concept is abstract. It’s not physically possible to name all the points that exist on a line. Students are not digging deep and realizing what the line or curve is really displaying (or saying). We’ve got to get them to see the details on the graph. Where does it start? Where does it end? What is happening between? I’ve created some online items that have worked well recently, but I have some older resources that I like to use too.

It’s important that students distinguish between finite and infinite values and which type make more sense for the problem. Give students real-life situations and make them think about these situations and what the graphs would look like in detail. A great example of a continuous function is when someone is getting gas out of a gas pump. Here’s a video you can use as an opener. There are tons of questions you could ask students about what is happening.

The concept of a vending machine is a great example of input and output (which would be a finite situation). If you push a certain button, then you get a certain item.

Photo by Erik Mclean on Pexels.com

Last year, I created the lesson below. It is a Google Docs with an embedded Google Drawings. Students can click on a Google Drawings and move pieces around or type. I have found this to be very interactive and useful.

Here’s a sample:

In the same activity, before I start having student plug into a table, I have them work on a function machine:

Function Machines in Google Drawings

This activity has 3 parts:

  • Relations and Functions
  • Domain and Range
  • Infinite vs. Finite Domain and Range

Below is another useful activity that I think works well for students each year. This lesson introduces reasonable Domain and Range and we practice which variable is independent and which one is dependent. The worksheet seen below is a tiny look at this activity that contains 10 graphs where the students are asked to find the domain and range. There are 5 linear graphs, 3 quadratic graphs, one circle and a graph with only points. Another worksheet asks students to create graphs with a given domain and range.

I love Boom Cards, so I’ve got a couple of Domain and Range activities that are great for extra practice. The problem below is a sample question in this activity. The students do not know what a parabola is at this point, but I still give them all types of functions. We will come back to domain and range again when we get to quadratics and exponentials. If you click on the picture, you will be taken to a chance to get this FREEBIE.

Finally an escape challenge is the ultimate fun activity to end Domain and Range. If students can get through this tough challenge, then not only do they understand domain and range as well as reasonable domain and range, but they are good at following directions, reading carefully, figuring out combinations and they have that finishing spirit!

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timefliesedu

Math teacher dedicated to sharing teacher tips, ideas and resources.

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